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Later, it toddles off to relax under a patch of leafy ground cover.

I'm not one to crow, but my pet's a rook... CORVUS by Esther Woolfson

Koi-Cat is out this morning too. But he gets a bit too close to hidden Baby Crow! Koi-cat looks, thinks, and takes cover under a wooden sawhorse. Later, I overhear some lessons in crow etiquette. Next morning, Charles puts a peanut on the sawhorse.

Rainbow Crow

Parent Crow shows up. Crow takes its peanut. Then Koi steps back out. Apparently I am now a trusted member of the crow patrol. Here I sit relaxing on the deck. Parent Crow lands nearby, on a tall pole and yells. So I look and I listen. Finally, I hear something deep in the bushes. The familiar trill of Nemesis-cat.

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But Charles literally broke bones tripping over him one summer. So, we call him Nemesis. So I roar. And I roar again. Parent Crow calms down. Charles gives Parent Crow a peanut. But right on cue, just as we worry, crows show up. He calls out. And one second later, Mommy Crow tries to land on the same spot.

She bumps him off. Your allies against predators. Stop by anytime. Photo credits: Charles Kaplan; Melanie Piazza, discoverwildcare. Video credit: Charles Kaplan. Interesting, as always. Isaiah Thanks, Michele! Here in Richmond we have lots of resident eagles that share their territory with crows.


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Watching them duke it out is an education. The back of my house faces a park. It is not unusual to see eagles circling over the field looking for rats to eat. Eagles are scavengers, so rats, birds, bird eggs and fish are all fair game. The eagle just ignores them and keeps flying. Richmond is surrounded by a dyke.

We often walk the part that faces the Strait of Georgia, where there is a dead tree that I call the eagle tree. Eagles come there with their catch, perch on a top branch where they leisurely tear it apart. The crows immediately perch on the lower branches waiting for leftovers to fall to the ground.

As the Crow Flies | Official website for Jeffrey Archer

I guess that this is the line they do not cross. We had a fledgling with a broken wing in our fenced backyard. We contacted some wildlife rehabbers who told us if it wasn't healed within two weeks it never will. We allowed the fledgling to stay in the backyard and put out food for the parents and they have continued to feed the fledgling. After several months, the wing which had been hanging started to be held closer to his body. Eventually the fledgling did fly out of the backyard over the fence and is improving everyday. I still find him in the neighborhood and take food to the parents.

What to do about crows

Hopefully he will be able to roost with them at night soon. Occasionally I have seen him on single story roofs and I hope he will be strong enough to go with the family if they leave when the snow comes. The ones around my house love the sun flower seed I put out, and that happened by accident.

I was feeding other birds when they just started showing up and picking out only the sun flower seed. I feed them a stash of there on now. There very Intelligent birds. I have a family of backyard crows. I too felt worried about feeding, but I have observed that they won't become dependent. They have activity a life that does not depend on a humans schedule. I don't usually feed yr round except for a couple of stragglers that hang around throughout the winter. I provide watermelon on my balcony during fledging.

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I would rather that they nest elsewhere, but I'm tolerant. Neighborhood cats hang around and makes me nervous for them. When I feed I don't stick around. I only feed when they sit at my kitchen window while I'm cooking or doing the dishes.

They see me in the window and roost at the window giving me goo goo eyes. They turn their nose up sometimes and just hang around roosting on the back of the patio chair. They are very teratorial and rarely a war accept in the spring time. I think the demand to keep the brooder fed and the fledging fed is stressful so any food no matter how hard to obtain is sought after by a few unwelcomed families.

They dive bomb the intruders just as if they would treat a hawk swooping by. One time I picked up one of their babies that I had felt fell out of the tree too soon and it really caused an uproar. So I just left it alone. It took a week or so before they stopped screaming at me and things returned to normal. They later brought this one to the balcony for watermelon.

There is usually 3 to 4 babies in late spring and then sometimes one more baby much later. Around early fall there is just 1 primary close to me and others hanging around lurking and waiting until I shut the door I don't know where everyone else goes after a summer of high activity, probably inland to the city dump It's quiet and feels as if the vacationing family have left for the summer.

I feed a family of 3 crows during my tea and dinner breaks at work. I'v seen the older pair bring up 2 young crows now. The current young one lands on my van door and takes the food from my hand.